Viva Mexico: Jaline Resort

by Kristin Vukovic

Female entrepreneurs who are elevating sustainable luxury fashion 

Not all sustainable fashion brands are created equal. A passion for native techniques and materials, and respect for local artisans, are at the heart of these sustainable luxury labels, which go above and beyond the typical definition. 

Founded by dynamic women, these three labels have deep roots in Mexico— utilizing authentic Mexican looming techniques, vintage Mexican coins and surplus and recycled cotton threads in their stunning jewelry and clothing designs. The result? Traditional craftsmanship with a modern, elegant flair. 

Jaline Resort

This artisan-crafted resort brand was recently awarded the Butterfly Mark from Positive Luxury in recognition of excellence in sustainability. Jaline Resort uses locally purchased non-GMO cotton, silk and a modal-viscose blend, and employs primarily women weavers in Oaxaca, Mexico, who use traditional craftsmanship in creating textiles for the contemporary, feminine collections. 

“Oaxaca always feels like my second home; reconnecting with the weavers is my favorite part of the trip,” says New York City-based founder Jacqueline Lopez, who previously lived in Mexico City. “We work on new weaving techniques, color combinations and designs, and being there together we can experiment and come up with new ideas.” 

Lopez found creative ways to use scraps and extra fabric that would otherwise go to waste. “The ‘Mommy and Me’ collection was always made for my friends and their daughters, but when Maisonette [Children’s Boutique] approached me to create a capsule collection, I decided to launch it and now it is a special project that helps me to use all leftover scraps—and those smaller scraps are now used in hair accessories,” she says. 

Each textile is handwoven on a pedal loom, a man-made machine operated by a skilled artisan who prepares the loom to different widths required for various garments. Depending on the design and intricacy of the piece—which can take up to three weeks to complete—the artisan must time the rhythm of their feet with their hands in a synchronized symphony. Each piece is then intricately hand-knotted to create a macramé design, a process that requires both time and precision. jalineresort.com

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